Transforming Integrated Care in the Community

The Transforming Integrated Care in the Community (TICC) project is a four-year cross-border project which has been approved and funded by the Interreg 2 Seas Programme 2014 – 2020 (co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund).

Transforming Integrated Care in the Community

The Transforming Integrated Care in the Community (TICC) project is a four-year cross-border project which has been approved and funded by the Interreg 2 Seas Programme 2014 – 2020 (co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund).

There are 14 partners across the UK and Europe to implement the Buurtzorg model in three new countries France, Belgium and the UK, including here in Kent and Medway. The project will also be developing a blueprint to enable the model to be transferred and implemented across Europe, this will include identifying barriers to implementation and how these can be overcome, which is unique to this project. The TICC project officially began on 12th July 2017, we are currently in the implementation stage with our first pilot set up in Edenbridge.

Overview of Buurtzorg Model

The Buurtzorg model was founded in 2006 in the Netherlands by Jos de Blok in response to nursing teams feeling dissatisfied and unhappy with the delivery of community healthcare. The aim of the Buurtzorg model was to improve the delivery and quality of community health care through leadership and collaboration with the community nurses. This led to the Buurtzorg model adopting a nurse-led approach which empowers both the nurses and patients receiving care. Buurtzorg nurses work autonomously and are able to practise to their highest level of training, within this model the nurses are also responsible for delivering personal care alongside nursing care as this gives the opportunity to carry out observations. The focus of this model is on a patient’s current needs and prevention, to support prevention once a patient is assigned to a Buurtzorg team even when their nursing need is resolved and they only require personal care they stay with the team rather than move to a new service. This enables the nurses who know the patient to spot early signs of deterioration so they act and respond in the first instance. The nurses are also supported by a back office of 45 members of staff who are to enable the nurses to spend the majority of the time with patients (60% patient facing time). Initially, when this model was first founded by Jos de Blok there was only one small team of Buurtzorg four nurses and by 2014 this grew to 8,000.

The Pilots in Kent

Kent County Council and Kent Community Health NHS Foundation Trust are working together to implement integrated community teams that will work to the principles of Buurtzorg. Edenbridge has been identified as the first pilot site in Kent, a team has been recruited that is made up of nurses and care workers to deliver an integrated and holistic service which went live on 7th January 2019.

A second pilot site in Kent has been identified as Charing in Ashford and is currently in the planning stage.

Interreg 2 Seas Mers Zeeen TICC European Regional Development Fund

Further Information

For the further information and the latest updates on the Transforming Integrated Care in the Community Project please visit Kent County Council’s project webpage.

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If you have any questions in relation to the Transforming Integrated Care in the Community Project please email [email protected]